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Book review

“Ayoade on Top” by Richard Ayoade – book review

One-sentence review: If you know and like Richard Ayoade’s unique sense of humour, this is for you.

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Book review

“The Summer of My Amazing Luck” by Miriam Toews – book review

One-sentence review: Wry, dry (even though it’s set in a rainy Canadian city) and moving.

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Book review

“Slow Days, Fast Company” by Eve Babitz – book review

One-sentence review: Pure, unadulterated hedonistic literary escapism. 

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Book review

“Outline” by Rachel Cusk – book review

One-sentence review: A quiet, thoughtful and seductive look into other people’s fears and relationships. 

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Book review

“French Exit” by Patrick deWitt – book review

One-sentence review: like a PG Wodehouse comedy but with a darker edge.

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Book review

“Vernon God Little” by DBC Pierre – book review

One-sentence review: A jaw-droppingly brilliant comic novel.

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Book review

“Hot Milk” by Deborah Levy – book review

One-sentence review: languorous, mysterious and evocative with a dark twist.

Slightly longer review:

A young woman uncertain of herself is in a coastal Spanish town so she can take her cranky hypochondriac mother to a specialist who might be a crank himself.

In some ways this is a coming-of-age novel, as Sofia falls in love with the mysterious and imperious Ingrid, has blissful love-free sex with the young man who treats jellyfish stings at the beach, and she contemplates what to do with her anthropology studies while using anthropology as a frame with which to study her confusing world.

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Book review

“The New Me” by Halle Butler – book review

One-sentence review: A caustic tale of modern life, with its alienation, bad friends and dreams of self improvement.

Slightly longer review:

As children, we often think books ought to be about larger than life characters: adventurers, royalty, vampires and magicians. 

Yet when we’re older and our dreams of becoming rock stars, professional athletes or Hollywood actors have dissolved, it’s the life-size characters that often resonate: the office worker, the lonely, the depressed and – in the case of The New Me, it’s all three.

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Book review

“Ask the Dust” by John Fante – book review

Far before J.D. Salinger’s Catcher in the Rye and John Kennedy Toole’s A Confederacy of Dunces, there was an author writing about young misfits with flair and passion: John Fante.

In the 1930s Fante began a series of novels starring Arturo Bandini, a delusional, obnoxious, socially incompetent and penniless wannabe writer who is, I am afraid to say, someone I relate far too closely to. Fante’s first novel, The Road to Los Angeles, was rejected and unpublished until after his death in 1985. The second, Wait Until Spring, Bandini (1938), gained critical praise but it was his third – Ask the Dust (1939) – that was a work of genius.

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Book review

“A Manual for Cleaning Women” by Lucia Berlin – book review

One sentence review: the most beautifully written, moving and yet sweetly humorous collection of short stories I can remember reading.

Slightly longer review

I’ve recently read two collections of short stories by authors championed by Black Sparrow Press: A Manual for Cleaning Women by Lucia Berlin and The Bell Tolls for No One by Charles Bukowski.

On a superficial level there ought to be similarities: both authors were alcoholic underground writers who wrote about the low life with thinly-veiled versions of themselves as narrators. And yet in terms of style, heart, intelligence and maturity there is a world of difference between them.